Tuesday, January 23, 2018

7am lahaina town has inconsistent clean knee to waist high waves. Bit less energy than yesterday unfortunately.

Tuesday 1 23 18 morning call

A shortboard and a windsurf sessions for me yesterday. First one was a 10 (for my very personal standards), second one was pretty wild. With three solid swells still in the water (NW, NNW and E) plus the wind chop, the surface of the open ocean was a mess. Just to keep the board planing, I had to do a constant leg workout to absorb the bumps. It wasn't the usual sequence of crests and troughs, it was more like a random number of crests and throughs all adding on top of each other. Nonetheless, that made the planing action really fun and engaging for a change. Around 4pm the Pauwela buoy was reading a remarkable 4.5f 18s and Hookipa looked totally epic. Some big closeout sets suggested me to sail somewhere else though, but I still got to ride a couple of dreamy clean waves like this one below.

Photo by Jimmie Hepp from from this gallery.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore

No indication of southerly energy at the buoys, but we've learned that that doesn't mean there isn't any. As I reported in the morning from the beach, the waves on the Lahaina side were a solid waist to chest high with occasional bigger sets. I'm going again today (got to get out of the damn wind), stay tuned for a beach report. The Surfline forecast calls for 2.4f 14s at 8am.

North shore
NW101
6.5ft @ 16s from 289° (WNW)

Waimea
5.5ft @ 17s from 307° (WNW)

Pauwela
6.3ft @ 10s from 76° (ENE)
5.5ft @ 16s from 317° (NW)
3.6ft @ 6s from 73° (ENE)
 
Sunday's old NW swell disappeared from the buoys, but there's still some solid numbers from yesterday's new one plus the easterly windswell. Below are the graphs of the three reported buoys showing that the swell should hold all day locally (red dotted line) before declining tomorrow. Notice also how it went more west at the NW101 buoy (red circle in the direction graph which is below the size graph). Lastly, notice how the Pauwela graph looks exactly like the Surfline forecast I posted yesterday.


Wind map at noon shows easterly trades.

North Pacific shows 2 WNW fetches, a lovely N one and a E one.


Nothing of relevance in the South Pacific.


Morning sky.

Monday, January 22, 2018

7am lahaina town has inconsistent waist to occasionally higher sets. Didn't see the spots on the way, because it was too dark, but there's definitely long period energy in the water.

Monday 1 22 18 morning call

A shortboard and a longboard sessions for me yesterday. The windsurfers at Hookipa are enjoying an exceptional winter with lots of good sailing days, specially in January. Photo by Jimmie Hepp from this gallery.


3am significant buoy readings
South shore

No indication of southerly energy at the buoys, the Surfline forecast calls for 2.2f 15s. Yesterday the waves at Thousand Peaks were still in the knee to occasionally thigh high range, but the energy it should start increasing soon. Below is the collage of the fetches of Jan 13, 14, 15 and 16 that generated this out of season swell. Small stuff, be it could be fun.


North shore
NW101
6.8ft @ 17s from 312° (NW)
 
Hanalei
4.7ft @ 12s from 342° (NNW)
4.4ft @ 18s from 313° (NW)
 
Waimea
3.2ft @ 13s from 337° (NNW)                      
3.1ft @ 18s from 308° (WNW)
 
Pauwela
6.6ft @ 11s from 83° (E)
4.2ft @ 13s from 347° (NNW)                      
1.4ft @ 20s from 319° (NW)

New WNW swell on the rise, while yesterday's NNW one slowly declines and the easterly windswell stays steady.

Below is the graph of the four reported buoys, together with the Surfline forecast. I circled in red the new WNW swell that is moving down the chain of islands with the usual delay and decay due to travel. In this case, some of Maui's spots will get blocked a bit, not so much Hookipa, but more down the coast towards Kahului and on the west side.

The red dotted line was drawn according to the Surfline forecast that only calls for 3.8f 16s at 8pm. So for the first part of the day most of the energy in the water will still be provided by yesterday's unblocked NNW swell (purple line), while in the afternoon (and definitely tomorrow) the new WNW swell should become dominant (yellow line).

The red line is the easterly windswell that somehow will manage to stay elevated for the next two weeks (!) or so. Fortunately, the fetches that will generate that will be well offshore, so that won't necessarily mean howling local trades. Get your east exposed spots figured out, you guys. Grab a map and look what's facing east, it's that simple.


Wind map at noon shows easterly trades.

North Pacific shows a tiny NW fetch, a small but nice N one and an extended easterly windswell one.


South Pacific has a strong fetch oriented towards south America, but I doubt we'll get any angular spreading from it.


Morning sky.

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Sunday 1 21 18 morning call

Shortboard, SUP foiling and longboard sessions for me yesterday and that's all before going to work at 2pm. I was so busy, I had no time to take a photo of the day, so here's one of those amazing shot by Ben Thouard in Tahiti.


2am significant buoy readings
South shore

No indication of southerly energy at the buoys, the Surfline forecast calls for a slowly rising 1.4f 15s.

North shore
NW101
4.9ft @ 13s from 348° (NNW)

Hanalei
4ft @ 14s from 340° (NNW)

Waimea
2.6ft @ 15s from 329° (NW)

Pauwela
8.5ft @ 10s from 71° (ENE)
3.0ft @ 4s from 81° (E)
2.5ft @ 16s from 333° (NNW)

New NW swell on the rise, below are the graphs of the four reported buoys, plus the Surfline forecast (yellow line), which reads 3f 15s at 8am and 4.3f 15s at 2pm.. As usual, you can see the swell moving down the island chain with the delay and the slight energy loss due to travelling. Not much refraction in this case, since the original direction has enough north and is unblocked.

Windswell still pumping from around 70 degrees. Waiheu side had some solid size and no wind yesterday morning. Unfortunately, that's not going to happen today, as the wind is already blowing pretty strong all along the north shore.


Wind map at noon shows moderate easterly trades.


North Pacific shows small scattered fetches and a easterly windswell one.


South Pacific offers a weak distant southerly fetch.


Morning sky.

Saturday, January 20, 2018

7am Hookipa has head and a half east windswell waves with already a bit of wind on them.
4

Saturday 1 20 18 morning call

Two shortboard and one longboard sessions for me yesterday. "Live every day like it was your last one", and that's exactly what I did yesterday.

The day started at Honolua Bay, where I took a surf guide customer. I'm specializing in "first time at the Bay, with small waves and light crowd", this is the fourth succesfull expedition of this kind. Here's a few shots I took before our session.



This is Rob from the east coast, visibly stoked after realizing a lifetime dream. I reminded him the etiquette rules and I made sure we weren't in the way of anyone. He got 3-4 waves at the Bay and he's gonna remember the day for possibly the rest of his life.


After that I drove towards the spot where I wanted to catch the big east swell, but I first stopped in Lahaina to catch a few waves with the longboard. How could I miss the opportunity to paddle out one more time my lovely nose rider on the possible last day of my life? It ended up being the best session, since it was just 2 of us riding blue, beautiful and clean knee to waist high waves (surprisingly the windswell was wrapping all the way down there).

Quite a few miles later (130 the total for the day!), I surfed this spot that was packed of ripping groms and grown up good surfers. Here's Micah Nickens.

Kai Barger's bottom turn.

The section is soft, but he had enough speed and aggressive approach...

...to throw a few buckets of spray.

This photo of Kai surreal. The background looks like a painting.

For a change, a little romance.

On the way back home, I stopped at Hookipa and took some more shots.

He got a double barrel on that wave. This is the exit of the second one.

I make an intensive use of my 25+ pieces wetsuit quiver. It baffles me that nobody really has a quiver of wetsuits. They don't get old if you don't use them, they take little room and they all offer a slightly different degree of warmth and confort. I pick them depending on the wind and sun conditions. And I'm not a fan of putting a wet one on.

I know nothing about this event, but here it is.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore

No indication of southerly energy at the buoys, the Surfline forecast calls for 0.8f 15s, even though yesterday I didn't notice any long period energy. It should be more noticeable Sunday/Monday/Tuesday.

North shore
Pauwela
11.2ft @ 10s from 67° (ENE)
Pumping windswell at Pauwela, that's pretty much all that is on tap today (next pulse of NW energy is due tomorrow). Hookipa and the Waiehu coast will be the spots. This last one should be well overhead, with a favorable wind prediction as illustrated below. But reality can be different and unfortunately there's 14mph of NW wind in Kahului at 6.45am. Hopefully just a local shower. Stay tuned for a Hookipa report.

Today we start with the wind map at 8am to show that the trades have a ESE direction and won't hit the north shore in the early morning.


But they will later on, this is the noon map.


Solid NW fetch in the North Pacific (6f 15s on Tuesday), together with a still strong east windswell one.


Nothing to be noted in the South Pacific.


Morning sky.

Friday, January 19, 2018

Friday 1 19 18 morning call

Days like yesterday are a blessings for me, as they provide me with an opportunity to rest my tired body. The only discipline I would have been interested in, would have been a SUP foiling downwinder, but I'm not good enough yet to handle those crazy windy conditions.

Here's a photo by Jeremy Riggs that shows (if you know the gopro cameras) the remarkable size of the windswell on a non-foiled Maliko run.


Here's a guy we all have to learn from. Live every day like it was your last one, because you know, one it will be and it could be today. And if you see that as a negative thought, you got it all wrong.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore

No indication of southerly energy at the buoys, the Surfline forecast calls for 0.5f 16s.

North shore
Pauwela
8.9ft @ 9s from 65° (ENE)
5.2ft @ 11s from 354° (N)
4.1ft @ 6s from 75° (ENE)
 
No new NW energy on tap today, so the only buoy we care about is Pauwela that shows still 5f 11s of declining northerly energy and a solid 9f 9s windswell from 65 degrees (trending east), which will provide the dominant blown out waves for the day.

Below is the graph, that looks just like the Surfline forecast I posted yesterday. Maybe a little difference in the fact that the northerly energy is hanging in there just slightly bigger than predicted and that might give me the opportunity to pull an unexpected successful surf guide rabbit off the hat this morning, we'll see.

Wind map at noon shows strong easterly trades.


North Pacific shows a NW fetch and a strong E windswell one.


Nothing of relevance in the South Pacific.


Morning sky.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Thursday 1 18 18 morning call

Two shortboard and a windsurf sessions for me yesterday. Session two was at Honolua, here's some photos.






Meanwhile, at Hookipa the conditions were quite radical with big waves and very strong wind. Casey Hauser found a diamond in the rough in this photo by Jimmie Hepp from this gallery.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore

No indication of southerly energy at the buoys, the Surfline forecast calls for 0.6f 15s starting at 2pm and very slowly increasing throughout the next few days.

North shore
NW101
6.4ft @ 12s from 330° (NW)

Waimea
6.7ft @ 13s from 319° (NW)

Pauwela
8.1ft @ 13s from 327° (NW)
6.7ft @ 8s from 72° (ENE)
2.6ft @ 6s from 75° (ENE)
2.4ft @ 9s from 339° (NNW)
 
The NW swell peaked yesterday afternoon as predicted, now it's on its way down, but 8f 13s at 4am is still a solid couple of numbers. Below are the graphs of NW101, Pauwela and the Surfline forecast. Notice how the black line stayed almost steady after the peak of the ground swell at the NW buoy. That's because it indicates the significant wave height, which is the result of all the energies present in the water (more precisely, it's the average of the highest one-third of all of the wave heights during the 20-minute sampling period). That's an information of very little interest, unless your spot is open to all the directions, like a buoy.

Underneath the black line, there's the individually sorted swell events and that's what you want to know in order to correctly make your call.
Check the forecast now. Today the NW ground swell (red line) is predicted to go down quite quickly, while the easterly windswell (purple line) is on the rise. 
The resulting height of the waves at your spot(s) of interest is part of the local knowledge that each surfer should have.



Wind map at noon shows strong easterly trades.


North Pacific shows a WNW and a NW fetches and a windswell one.


South Pacific doesn't show anything of relevance.


Morning sky.