Thursday, October 17, 2019

Thursday 10 17 19 morning call

I'd like to start this call with this great photo by Jeremy Riggs, picturing the amazing Kathy Shipman on a downwinder. IF my fingers will be fixed by the upcoming surgery, I'm gonna go back at doing those too. First with the wing to learn the bumps and then with the paddle.


This completely different scenario instead was sent me by blog reader James Dawson. There was some shore break at Makena yesterday, my guess is that it was from the westerly energy of the typhoon.


This is my pick out of Jimmie Hepp's daily album of the windsurfing action at Hookipa. The Aloha Classic is coming up at the end of the month and there's a lot of excellent sailors in town.


6am significant buoy readings and discussion
South shore
Barbers
2ft @ 13s from 195° (SSW)

Lanai
1.3ft @ 12s from 181° (S)
1ft @ 16s from 196° (SSW)

Small numbers at the buoys, small waves on the cam. Check it out yourself before going.


North shore
NW001
4.1ft @ 13s from 339° (NNW)

W
1.6ft @ 15s from 283° (WNW)

SW
1.5ft @ 15s from 300° (WNW)

Waimea
3.4ft @ 8s from 348° (NNW)
2.9ft @ 7s from 10° (N)
1.7ft @ 11s from 331° (NNW)
1.5ft @ 15s from 340° (NNW)

Pauwela
3.4ft @ 6s from 65° (ENE)
2.6ft @ 9s from 350° (N)
2.2ft @ 7s from 62° (ENE)
1.8ft @ 15s from 1° (N)

Interpreting the buoy readings is often a chess game. Let's first read what Pat Caldwell wrote 2 days ago: The extratropical remnant of Hagibis raced from near Hokkaido, Japan late 10/12 to the western Bering Sea 10/14. The fast track limited surf potential. Low, long-period swell is predicted to fill in locally Thursday from 305-315 degrees. It should peak on Friday from 310-325 degrees at levels below the October average.

A second swell is due on Thursday locally. A low pressure intensified N of Hawaii 10/13-14 as it moved into the Gulf of Alaska 10/15. It had a short duration of direct aim at Hawaii, then a longer duration aimed more NE of Hawaii but close enough for angular spreading.
Surf should pick up on Thursday from 340-360 degrees then slowly fall Friday into Saturday from 355-020 degrees. It should be below average.

Below are the maps of Oct 12, 13, 14 and 15 where you can see both the typhoon moving NE and the low of the second swell developing N of us. So, the NNW/N readings at the buoys most likely come from this last one, but the WNW reading at the W and SW buoys could be from the typhoon fetch. IF the directions of these last two is correct, that means that the energy hitting the buoys comes from the stages of the typhoon just after it left Japan (which sits at about 300 degrees from us), which happened on the 12 and 13. That would be good news, as the best day for that fetch was the 14th and so we might receive something from a better direction (around 320) tomorrow. This is just speculations based on the direction reported by the buoys, which, as we know, are not reliable at all, as they're influenced by all the other swells in the water.


"Rigth GP, but after all that, how big are the waves going to be today?!?", I can hear someone screaming...
Well, if I look at the buoy's graphs (below is Waimea), the only component that came up significantly compared to yesterday is that 8/9s N energy. Really hard to call the size (Mama's cam also down), I'm gonna go for the usual head high at Hookipa. Stay tuned for a possible beach report later this morning.


Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has pretty much nothing to talk about.


Same in the South.


Morning sky.

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Wednesday 10 16 19 morning call

Session n.5 on a wing for me yesterday and boy, is that thing finger use intensive! Here's a video from Alex Aguera who gives a couple of tips for the wave riding.


This is my pick of Jimmie Hepp's daily album of the windsurfing action at Hookipa.


5am significant buoy readings and discussion
South shore
Barbers
2.2ft @ 13s from 195° (SSW)                        
0.7ft @ 18s from 247° (WSW)
 
Lanai
1.9ft @ 13s from 186° (S)
 
Couple of feet 13s, as the southerly energy at the buoys continues to go down, so will the size of the waves. The 18s reading at Barbers could be coming from Hagibis, but I wouldn't count on that, as Kihei looks totally flat in the webcams. The Lahaina cam shows mostly flat with inconsistent knee to occasionally waist high sets (Lanai looks gorgeous, though). Check it out yourself before going.



North shore
Waimea
2ft @ 15s from 303° (WNW)
1.8ft @ 10s from 335° (NNW)
 
Pauwela
2.7ft @ 8s from 70° (ENE)                        
1.8ft @ 10s from 12° (NNE)
 
No NW energy at any of the buoys other than Waimea (we lost Hanalei, btw). With those numbers at Pauwela, Hookipa should be pretty flat this morning.

Overall, another day with extremely small waves on both south and north shores. During the transition seasons it can happen that both shores have pumping waves, but it can also happen that neither one has much. All normal, nothing to worry about. Do your chores, the waves will come.

Wind map at noon.

No fetches in the North Pacific in this sub-average start of the fall.


Small/weak S fetch in the South Pacific.


Morning sky.

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Tusday 10 15 19 morning call

Bit of a small waves everywhere moment here, so let me get you all drooling by posting this shot by Liquid Barrel, who is an Bali resident Italian photographer that I met in Indo.


This is the biggest wave I could find in Jimmie Hepp's daily album of the windsurfing action at Hookipa. Those Quatro twin fins were really good boards. I have a couple of used ones for sale at Hi-Tech.



4-5am significant buoy readings and discussion
South shore
NW001
1.8ft @ 12s from 243° (WSW)
 
That 12s period is the only possible indication of west swell due to the early stages (pre-Japan) of Hagibis. I do see some small lines at the Kihei cams, check them out yourself.

Barbers
2.7ft @ 14s from 204° (SSW)

Lanai
2.3ft @ 14s from 184° (S)

Couple of feet 14s never disappoints (me) in Lahaina and that's where I'm going also today. Inconsistent waist to belly plus was the size yesterday, today you can probably take the plus away today. Here's an early set on the webcam, which you should check yourself before going. Sorry, but I will keep repeating that forever, as the number of people who still get in the car without checking it, is for me hard to comprehend. Let's say I do it for the environment: you don't like what you see, you don't drive!


North shore
Pauwela
3.5ft @ 8s from 79° (ENE)                        
1.5ft @ 14s from 331° (NNW)
 
My guess on the 14s energy is that it's what we're getting out of the fetch associated with the low that formed north of us in the last couple of days. The collage below shows the maps of Oct 13 and 14. We haven't received yet the one produced my the latest stages of Hagibis.



Wind map at noon.


North Pacific only has a very small fetch in the NW corner.


South Pacific only has a very small fetch in the Tasman Sea.


Morning sky.

Monday, October 14, 2019

Monday 10 14 19 morning call

Wing show at Hookipa yesterday, this is Kai Lenny.


Zane Schweitzer.


Because of the nature of the different disciplines, windsurfers can hit lips harder and stay in the more critical section of the wave, but can't get air as easy as on the wing (same if compared to kiters). That doesn't make a discipline better than the other, as they're obviously all fun.


4am significant buoy readings and discussion
South shore
Barbers
1.8ft @ 17s from 189° (S)
1.3ft @ 13s from 212° (SW)

Lanai
1.7ft @ 15s from 182° (S)

Waves were inconsistent but nice and waist to chest high yesterday, today should be similar. Check the webcam before going (it looks very inconsistent, as in the nature of angular spreading swells).


North shore
Pauwela
5.3ft @ 8s from 80° (E)

Nothing but windswell at Pauwela, another small day at Hookipa.

Wind map at noon.


Nice fetch out of Hagibis in the NW corner plus another small one with that low N of us, which unfortunately is moving away. Surfline doesn't show much of a swell yet, but I think Thursday/Friday there will be waves at Hookipa.


South Pacific has a small fetch in the Tasman Sea.


Morning sky.

Sunday, October 13, 2019

Sunday 10 13 19 morning call

Young Maui ripper Erin Brooks is in Australia competing in some contests.


She also posted this photo on which I commented: "Impressive. If that's what it takes to surf like you, then I stand no chances..."



Jimmie Hepp went to Hookipa despite the lack of proper waves and posted this album, out of which this is my pick.


3am significant buoy readings and discussion
South shore
Barbers
1.3ft @ 13s from 188° (S)
0.9ft @ 18s from 196° (SSW)
 
Lanai
1.4ft @ 18s from 193° (SSW)
1.3ft @ 13s from 188° (S)
 
Decent 18s numbers at the buoys, with a 13s energy in the background. Today should be a small but decent day on the south shore, check the Lahaina webcam before going. From 5am to 12pm there's a marathon, so expect traffic to be slow and no parking at Guardrails.
Thanks to the full moon, I was able to capture this wave at 4.50am.
 
North shore
N
3.5ft @ 11s from 350° (N)
 
Hanalei
2.1ft @ 11s from 321° (NW)
 
Waimea
1ft @ 11s from 326° (NW)
 
Pauwela
5.1ft @ 8s from 89° (E)                        
2.1ft @ 11s from 355° (N)
 
Couple of feet 11s from the N at Pauwela (and the other buoys), not sure where this is coming from, but we'll take it. Hookipa should be a bit bigger than yesterday, when it was only windswell.

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has a small WNW fetch associated with Typhoon Hagibis which has now left Japan and is moving towards the Kuril islands in a slightly better position for our wave generation. It will not get any closer though. Meanwhile, a new low formed N of us (the third in this month), but the related fetch is pretty weak and it's too far away to really block the trades, which in turn show a windswell fetch.


South Pacific has mostly a strong fetch oriented towards Central and South America out of which we hopefully will get some angular spreading (should be similar to the current one).


Morning sky.

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Saturday 10 12 19 morning call

OneMoreFoto is still busy shooting barrels in France with the Dakine photoshoot. This is Leif Engstrom.


4am significant buoy readings and discussion.
Barbers
1.6ft @ 12s from 243° (WSW)
1ft @ 4s from 174° (S)
0.6ft @ 20s from 204° (SSW)

Lanai
1.7ft @ 13s from 204° (SSW)
0.7ft @ 20s from 204° (SSW)

Small 12-13s energy plus a new small 20s swell showing at the buoys. Seen the lack of waves on the north shore, Lahaina might be the place to go today. Let's see how Pat Caldwell describes the evolution of the fetch:
A storm-force system tracked rapidly east along 60S to the S to SE of New Zealand 10/4-6. Seas over a wide fetch grew above 30 feet with aim at the Americas. Angular spreading should bring in surf locally.
The onset stage is Saturday 10/12 with inconsistent sets out of 180-200 degrees. The event should be filled in and peak on Sunday 10/13, then slowly drop into Monday 10/14 from the same direction.

Below are the maps of Oct 4, 5 and 6 that might help follow. The angular spreading fetch he's talking about is clearly visible on the 5th.


It took me 15 minutes to catch a 20s set on the webcam, but unfortunately the wind is onshore at the moment and conditions are what you see. Do check the webcam yourself, as things can change.


North shore
NW101
3.1ft @ 11s from 285° (WNW)

Hanalei
2.1ft @ 11s from 324° (NW)

Waimea
1.2ft @ 12s from 334° (NNW)

Pauwela
4.4ft @ 7s from 88° (E)                        
1.2ft @ 13s from 345° (NNW)
 
Not much leftover of the small and inconsistent NW swell, it should be another close to flat day. Plus it's windy already. Might be another good day for resting.

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has a small W fetch associated with Typhoon Hagibis, which has made landfall in Japan and is bringing torrential rain (small west swell predicted for the 14-15), and a windswell fetch.


South Pacific might have a couple of sections of that fetch that are oriented towards us, but it's mostly another angular spreading one.


Morning sky.

Friday, October 11, 2019

9.30am hookipa is now windy and the frequency of the sets is pretty low.
2

7.30am hookipa is mostly flat with inconsistent waist to occasionally shoulder high nw sets. Bit of wind, very empty.
3.5

Friday 10 11 19 morning call

Thanks to blog reader Geoff for his donation and for pointing out that link n.1 of GP's meteo links was not working anymore and for proposing a replacement, which I updated the link with.

Pretty much a waveless day yesterday, maybe that's what inspired Ian Walsh to post this photo of Jaws by Mike Neal on his page.


4am significant buoy readings and discussion
South shore
Barbers
1.6ft @ 14s from 221° (SW)                        
1.1ft @ 12s from 205° (SSW)

Lanai
1.5ft @ 13s from 196° (SSW)
1.2ft @ 15s from 210° (SSW)
 
Not only the numbers are small, but the wind is blowing from the south also today and it's all blown out in Lahaina. Not the place to go today, but check the webcam later in the day, things can always change.

North shore
NW001
2.3ft @ 13s from 253° (WSW)
 
Hanalei
1.6ft @ 14s from 319° (NW)
 
Waimea
0.9ft @ 15s from 302° (WNW)
 
Pauwela
7ft @ 8s from 93° (E)                        
1.2ft @ 15s from 327° (NW)
 
New small long period NW swell is at the buoys (direction at the NW one is questionable). Let's first read how Pat Caldwell describes the evolution of the fetch:
A compact severe gale in the Kamchatka corner 10/5 tracked N into the Bering Sea. Winds weakened 10/6 south of the western Aleutians. A minor event is expected locally with some long-period forerunners late Thursday. The surf from 315-325 degrees should peak on Friday then drop on Saturday. With the long travel distance and narrow fetch, sets should be inconsistent.
 
Below are the maps of Oct 5, 6 and 7. I put an arrow on the fetch that is responsible for this small episode. Notice how quickly it moved into the Bering sea and how far away it was, so we can't expect much from it. As a matter of fact, Hookipa looks pretty flat in the webcam, there might be some small sets here and there. Probably I'll post a beach report later. Overall, a good day to rest.

Wind map at noon. This model got it SO wrong yesterday, it might be wrong ALSO today. Two factors contributed to the bad prediction: the wind had a touch of south in it (maybe more than a touch, as it was wrapping around the other way and blowing Kona in Kahului) and the clouds didn't allow the usual thermal component to develop.


North Pacific has a small W fetch associated with Typhoon Hagibis (small west swell predicted for the 14-15) and a windswell fetch.


South Pacific has no fetches of relevance.


Morning sky.