Friday, June 22, 2018

Friday 6 22 18 morning call

A longboard and a SUP foiling downwinder attempt for me yesterday. Just a few days ago we had great waves on both north and south shore, now it's pretty much flat everywhere. That's when the downwinders kick in. Unfortunately my technique is still so poor that I only had the foil up once, but the only way to learn is to keep trying and that's what I'll do. Trigger fingers permitting.

It appears that the foil category of the John Pops Ah Choy invitational is going to be today around 2pm at Queens in Wailuku. Couldn't find any other info online.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore

Barbers
0.9ft @ 13s from 194° (SSW)

Despite the encouraging 13s reading at Barbers, all I can see in the Ala Moana webcam is refracted windswell (both from our trades or the southern hemisphere ones). Expect close to flat conditions everywhere.


The reason for that is that there were no fetches oriented towards us about 7 days ago in the Southern hemisphere. Below are the maps of June 15 and 16. I circled in black a wide area of strong SE trades as the outer buoys read the windswell out of that, but we don't receive much of it, because of the shadow of the Big Island. That's actually a good thing. Imagine having that energy interfering with the clean lines when there's a southerly ground swell in the water instead...


North shore
Pauwela
3.6ft @ 6s from 75° (ENE)
2.7ft @ 8s from 52° (ENE)

Tiny numbers at Pauwela, we knew that was going to happen since we didn't see and fetch in the North Pacific for the last few days.

Wind map at noon.


Only a windswell fetch in the North Pacific.



Once again I'm looking deep south and I had to put an x where Hawaii is. The red circles are the fetches oriented towards us, the blue one is a stronger one of which we should get some angularly spread energy.


Morning sky.

Thursday, June 21, 2018

6.30am Hookipa has waist to shoulder high waves at pavilions and the point. Light wind picking up.
3.5

Thursday 6 21 18 morning call

A SUP session for me yesterday, before I engaged myself in the wonderful challenge of transferring skills and knowledge. The very satisfying results are shown in the photo below. Without a doubt, windfoiling (with a slow foiling foil, like the SUP/surf foils) remains the easiest way to learn how to foil. If you know how to windsurf, of course.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore

Barbers
1.8ft @ 11s from 189° (S)

Still something at Barbers (but not detected at the outer buoys), once in a while Ala Moana gets a belly high set like the one in the photo below, otherwise mostly flat even over there (without the blockage of Kahoolawe). Today my guess for Maui is flat to knee high, with occasional higher sets up to thigh.


North shore
Pauwela
3.4ft @ 9s from 48° (NE)
2.7ft @ 5s from 85° (E)

That's probably a better choice than going south, as Hookipa might still have some waist to chest high waves. I'll report from there around 6.30ish. Predicted to get windy by 7am though.

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has the tiniest NNW fetch you can think of. It might manage to send us some ripples though.


Once again, we got to look really deep south to find a fetch eventually oriented towards us in the South Pacific. I say eventually, because down there the distortion introduced by flattening on a map a curved section of the globe is higher than closer to the equator and since the great circle rays map on the right doesn't reach down there, I'm not really sure those winds are really oriented towards us.
But I circled in red as a sign of good hope. The blue part instead is a swell oriented towards the Americas and hopefully we'll get some angular spreading out of it. Hawaii is where the red X is.


Morning sky.

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

7am ukumehame is mostly knee high with occasional bigger sets

6am Hookipa is mostly flat with occasional waist to chest high waves at pavilions and the point.  Clean though.
3

Wednesday 6 20 18 morning call

A longboard session for me yesterday. No photos of the day, here's an interesting angle by Jason Hall.



4am significant buoy readings
South shore

W
1.8ft @ 12s from 165° (SSE)

SW
2ft @ 12s from 167° (SSE)

SE
2ft @ 11s from 170° (S)

Barbers
1.8ft @ 13s from 185° (S)

The readings at the buoys are better than what Surfline predicts, and we'll take that. I'm gonna guess knee to waist high. There actually was a small fetch on June 12 and 13 (map below) and that is the source of this energy, IMO. Directions at the outer buoys are for once consistent and reliable (seen the absence of strong easterly windswell in the ocean), while Barbers has the tendency to straighten everything up to the south. One aspect of the importance of knowing the position of the source of a swell is that you don't have to rely on the often unreliable directions of the buoy readings.



North shore
Pauwela
3.7ft @ 9s from 53° (ENE)
 
I wanted to play "where was the fetch" game also for that small 9s energy at Pauwela and I retrieved this map of June 16 where I circled what I think the source of it was. Don't forget that I sample the wind maps only once a day, so we don't have an history of what happened in between samples. Anyway, that should keep the flatness at bay, I will confirm that in a beach report from Hookipa around 6am.


Wind map at noon.


Not much going on in the North Pacific, which has two tiny fetches. I don't think we'll get anything out of the west one (remote and blocked), we might have a bit more chances to get a bit of angular spreading out of the not so well oriented, small and weak (but close enough) NW one. Allright, it was nice to have overhead waves on the north shore in the middle of June, now back to normal.


South Pacific has a closer fetch east of New Zealand and a much more remote one way down close to Antartica. I had to slide the whole map down to catch it, Hawaii is where the red X is. Next week should be ok on the south shore.



Morning sky.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

6am Hookipa has inconsistent waist to chest occasionally up to head high clean waves with moments of flatness.
5.5

Tuesday 6 19 18 morning call

A shortboard, a longboard and a SUP session for me yesterday. Conditions at Hookipa were excellent in the early morning, I took these photos after my two sessions, when the light trades already ruined the shape quite a bit. Still pretty good for this time of the year, though.




4am significant buoy readings
South shore

Barbers
2.2ft @ 12s from 209° (SSW)

South swell down to minimum terms (sorry, translating from Italian algebra language). Yesterday it was still knee to waist with occasional belly high sets, today it's probably going to be calf to knee/thigh high.

North shore
N
2.6ft @ 11s from 308° (WNW)

Pauwela
3ft @ 8s from 53° (ENE)
2.9ft @ 9s from 350° (N)
 
NW swell down to windswell levels at Pauwela. There might be a low amount of westerly energy in the water (possibly the one shown at the N buoy), but I don't think we'll see it in Maui. Wind is going to be calm in the morning, so at least the small waves will be clean at Hookipa. Bring your longboard is my strong suggestion. I'll post a beach report sometime after 6am.

As Pat Cadlwell (welcome back!) summarizes, we're gonna have quite a few days of wave minimum around the compass.
 
Can't really complain, as it has been an exceptional spell of very good surf on both shores.
 
Wind map at noon.
 
North Pacific has a tiny, non significant for us west fetch. Fourth day in a row of no wave generation for us.
 
That big southerly fetch I pointed out yesterday moved north and now offers a section (in red) oriented towards us with decent winds up to 35 knots and an ever stronger section (in blue) oriented towards central America, of which we should receive some angular spreading energy. Couple of feet 15s in a week.
 
Morning sky.