Monday, October 15, 2018

8.30am ukumehame is knee high with occasional bigger sets, clean but slow and a bit soft with the high tide. Hookipa had waves, but side on wind and poor conditions.

Monday 10 15 18 morning call

A SUP foiling and a SUP session for me yesterday. Once again the conditions at Thousand Peaks were exceptionally good. Here's brother Eddie with sparks all around, even under his board.


Buttery conditions.


This is an incredible shot by Jason Hall that shows the beauty of the... everything! My early morning session foil session was great, but I couldn't replicate the lines and the feelings of the day before, which was something really special.

Notice the offset placement of the (stick-on) strap inserts, so that the back foot ends up right in the middle of the board. Now imagine a cut back to the right: I would push with the heel and pull my toes against the straps for extra leverage. No straps? No thanks.
When I added the back foot strap, I hated it for 5 sessions. Then it stepped up my game. But we're all different.


As a sign of the good times to come, here's a photo of Cloudbreak posted yesterday on this page.




4am significant buoy readings
South shore
W
2.6ft @ 14s from 192° (SSW)

SW
3ft @ 15s from 159° (SSE)

SE
3.4ft @ 15s from 195° (SSW)

Barbers
3.2ft @ 15s from 190° (S)

Lanai
2.2ft @ 15s from 193° (SSW)

And once again, for the 7th day in a row, we have 3f 15s or more at the buoys. Tomorrow is predicted finally to come down a bit (but not much according to Surfline), but then next week we might have 4f 15s all week! I call this exceptional, as it doesn't happen often. I'm taking it easy this morning, so I'll report whenever I'll get there.

North shore
Pauwela
4.2ft @ 9s from 355° (N)

Still small energy from the north at Pauwela. That'll give Hookipa some breakers, but the wind will be side-onshore. Tomorrow the first long period sets of the big Wednesday swell will start arriving. Nothing at the buoys just yet.

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has the NW fetch that now has moved east a bit. I circled in red in the great circle rays map on the right the small but intense section of winds that are between 330 and 340. The energy coming out of that, will find its way to Honolua. The much bigger (but also weaker) section circled in black in between 320 and 330 and that most likely won't.

How many directions do you have in the "traditional" wave forecast website of your choice? Obviously only one, 332 in the case of Surfline. But it's never only one. That's the dominant one, there's always a range of directions in every swell (narrow hurricane fetches might be the only exception). Learn to read the weather maps, spot the fetches, remember them when the swell arrives and you'll build your own internal database of info that no app in this world will give you.


Massive fetches down under. The blue one is aimed east of us, but we'll get plenty angular spreading, the couple of red ones are aimed straight at us.


Morning sky.

Sunday, October 14, 2018

6.30am ukumehame is waist high with occasional bigger sets and clean. Hookipa looked small but clean from the distance.

Sunday 10 13 18 morning call

A longboard and a SUP foil session for me yesterday. This photo shows the excellent conditions at Hookipa thanks to the light offshore wind. Plenty barrels on offer.


This is a photo from two days ago when the foiling conditions already improved compared to the previous big day with a lot of water moving, but they were still far from perfect.

Well, they were yesterday. Waist to chest and absolute glass in the light of a gorgeous sunset. It was relatively slow too and the water all around the wave was incredibly still and clear. And the lines that all of the above allowed had some poetry in them, of a kind that I found difficult to rationalize into words. A fellow foiler nailed it:"GP, you looked like you were in peace".

He was right. The intense focus and attention to what's happening required to do those lines (at least with my skills), implied an absolute lack of distracting thoughts. Just the sensation on gliding over an incredibly beautiful expression of nature and being part of it. Foiling can be amazing.


3-4am significant buoy readings
South shore
W
2.2ft @ 12s from 185° (S)
1.9ft @ 15s from 177° (S)

SW
2.5ft @ 13s from 184° (S)

SE
3.6ft @ 14s from 188° (S)

Barbers
2.7ft @ 14s from 191° (SSW)

Lanai
2.7ft @ 14s from 201° (SSW)

Surfline has two overlapping SSW swells of 16 and 14 seconds respectively for today. Only the W buoy feels two different swell, my guess is that the periods are so similar at the other buoys that they put the two energies together. Doesn't particularly matter, those numbers will still provide plenty waves to the south shore today. Mostly likely in the waist high range, but with occasional bigger sets, specially the longer period ones. Lanai's graph below looks pretty steady.


North shore
Pauwela
3.3ft @ 9s from 23° (NNE)

Not much to play with on the north shore and with a down trend (Pauwela graph below), but the early morning should see some calm wind before the onshores will pick up around 10am.


Wind map at noon.

North Pacific has the strong NW fetch that's creating Wednesday big swell. Notice on the great circle ray map on the map that the fetch is between 320 and 330. Somehow, the WW3 model and its Surfline interpretation give us a predicted direction of 332, probably because they think the most energy will be associated with it. Remembering that Honolua has a shadow line of 335, this swell is for sure going to be big enough to wrap around Molokai and hit it, but it's going to be too west to be consistent. An ideal swell for the Bay would have a fetch that sits between 330 and 350. That's why observing the fetches is a key part of knowledge, imo. A part that most forecast sites don't give you.


Check this other example in the South Pacific. An exceptionally long fetch has setup for our delight. On the map on the right I put an arrow to show that it covers a distance that is grossly about 4 days of travel. That means this swell is going to last a long time, starting Saturday 10/20.


Morning sky.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

8.30am after session report:  conditions are excellent at hookipa.
8

6am hookipa has clean waves up to occasionally head high.
6

Saturday 10 13 18 morning call

Two SUP foiling and a longboard session for me yesterday. Dan of Destination 360 was out there with us in the morning and took this photo of Junior using both foil and board in this turn.


3am significant buoy readings
South shore
W
2.8ft @ 14s from 182° (S)

SW
2.7ft @ 14s from 161° (SSE)

SE
3.5ft @ 16s from 180° (S)

Barbers
3ft @ 15s from 190° (S)

Lanai
2.7ft @ 15s from 200° (SSW)

Still nice numbers at the buoys, it should be another fun day on the south shore. Yesterday Thousand Peaks was a lot better than the day before, with less closeouts and no wind all morning thanks to the cloudy sky. What made it a lot better is also and specially the fact that there were more lulls (like the one in the photo below) that allowed the water to settle down after a set. 


Not sure I'm going this morning, so I'm gonna call it up to chest high from home. Maybe with a little texture from the Kona flow, but that's really hard to say. The wind sensor at Maalaea reads 6 (g9) from WSW, but the one up Launiupoko shows calm. Below is the screeshot of my iWindsurf.com app.


North shore
3.6ft @ 10s from 61° (ENE)
2.7ft @ 11s from 63° (ENE)

I surfed Hookipa at sunset and it was really fun with occasional head high glassy peaks. Might be a tad smaller today.

Wind map at noon shows a southerly flow.


North Pacific about to kick into gear with a very promising fetch in the NW corner. Surfline calls for 9.4f 15s from 332 on Wednesday. Both Honolua and Jaws will break if that really happen.


South Pacific never kicked out of gear and today if offers a wonderful, strong and well oriented fetch SSE of New Zealand. This swell should reach 4f 15s next weekend and last all the following week.


Morning sky.

Friday, October 12, 2018

6.30am ukumehame is a little smaller than yesterday and overall better looking.

Friday 10 12 18 morning call

Yesterday by 11am I had already done SUP foiling, SUP and shortboard sessions. All of them at Thousand Peaks and none of them particularly remarkable, because the size and period was too much for the spot. 90% of the set waves were closeouts, but there were also some gems. I got a couple of the SUP, one on the shortboard and none on the SUP foiling. But that's because of my very high standards of judging the waves. Everybody else was stoked instead. Most surfers, give them the size and they're happy...

Here's Dave Kalama on a perfect foiling wave, for example. Photo by Destination 360.


This other one instead shows Hi Tech owner Kim Ball on a wave with way too much white water. Still fun, but not as much as a blue water wall. Thousand Peaks like chest high and 12-13s. Yesterday it was head high and 17-18s.


3am significant buoy readings
South shore
W
3ft @ 16s from 191° (SSW)

SW
3.6ft @ 15s from 158° (SSE)

SE
3.9ft @ 17s from 204° (SSW)

Barbers
3.5ft @ 17s from 189° (S)

Lanai
3.2ft @ 17s from 199° (SSW)

The SSW went down a tiny bit both in size and period, but not by much. This swell totally surprised me with its energy. And I got a feeling it surprised also Pat Caldwell. This is how yesterday he brilliantly analyzed the origin of it:
PacIOOS/CDIP southern-exposure buoys off Oahu and Lanai showed the long-period swell of 18-22 seconds fill in 10/10 and hold 10/11. The energy is dominant from the Tasman Sea angle of 208-220 degrees, though elevated from 180-200 degrees as well. Thus, there are overlapping events.
Hindcasting one can see a massive bulge of seas to 35 feet between 50-60S to the SW of Tasmania 10/2 that progressed eastward 10/3 to the SE of Tasmania at a distance over 5000 nm away.
At the same time 10/2-3, additional high seas above 30 feet were seen S to SE of New Zealand. This pattern slowly settled down 10/4 with seas to 25 feet in the Tasman and New Zealand windows, then dropped 10/5.
Give the extra-long, dominant wave periods in the 18-22 second band 10/11 in Hawaii, and the nature of wave dispersion, or the spreading out of swell trains as a function of wave period, with longer waves traveling faster, this should mean still elevated surf locally 10/12 as the dominant wave period slowly shifts downward. This event is expected to drop to near the average Saturday morning and below average late Saturday as a new event arrives.
North shore
Pauwela
5.1ft @ 9s from 46° (NE)

Just windswell at Hookipa, but good direction and decent period, so there will be fun waves to ride, also thanks to the lack of wind in the early morning.
Wind map at noon.

North Pacific has a NW fetch.


South Pacific has a fetch that resembles the one that created the current swell. The red circle shows the wind directly aimed at us, the blue one the ones aiming east of us out of which we will hopefully get some angular spreading energy. South Pacific continues to provide. Excellent season, no doubt.


Morning sky.

Thursday, October 11, 2018

7am ukumehame has up to head high closing out sets and no wind.

Thursday 10 11 18 morning call

A shortboard and a SUP foiling session for me yesterday. Here's a couple of shots from the early morning.

Kirby got a nice one.


Finless foam board.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore
W
3.4ft @ 17s from 191° (SSW)

SW
3.5ft @ 17s from 202° (SSW)

SE
4.9ft @ 16s from 197° (SSW)

Barbers
4.1ft @ 18s from 205° (SSW)

Lanai
3.5ft @ 18s from 211° (SW)

Awesome numbers at the buoy, today might be even bigger than yesterday on the south shore.
A blog reader at the beach remarked that I didn't really announce this swell. I replied, "well, if you look at the buoys, you know there's a swell!", but he was 100% correct, as it surprised me too. I had to go back to the fetches map and, with the help of Pat Caldwell, try to spot the origin.

Here's what he said: On 10/1-3, an area validated by JASON altimeter with seas well above 30 feet SE of New Zealand should be the source for the next new pulse locally. It should fill in Wednesday to levels above average, peak early Thursday, then slowly drop into Saturday from 180-200 degrees with added Tasman energy from 208-220 degrees.

Below is the maps of Oct 2 and 3, the newly drawn black circles are the origin of this swell and I completely overlooked them, as fetches in that position oriented towards us don't happen that often and the great circle ray map doesn't reach down there.


North shore
Pauwela
3.8ft @ 8s from 60° (ENE)
3.4ft @ 11s from 59° (ENE)
 
Hilo
6.3ft @ 12s from 93° (E)
 
I'm not convinved anymore that the 11s energy is from the NW as I wrote yesterday. I got to trust the buoys more I guess, at least Pauwela. I will do that today, and so what's up there is what you'll find in the water at Hookipa and on all the north shore. Sergio's swell still pumping if you have access to a east facing shore.
 
Wind map at noon.


North shore has a decent NW fetch, the windswell one and Sergio's that now is moving back to the east.


That's a powerful fetch down under, unfortunately New Zealand will block a lot of its energy, but not all. This is the first of a long series of good fetches that will keep the south shore alive (more like pumping, really) in the long range. It's been an excellent summer so far (at least when I was here) and it's far from over yet.

Morning sky.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

6.15am lahaina side has waist to chest high sets, occasionally bigger and clean everywhere.

Wednesday 10 10 18 morning call

A longboard, shortboard and SUP foiling session for me yesterday. I need to open this call with this epic shot by Franck Berthout that popped up as a 7 years old memory on Facebook. Here's what I wrote at the time.

I was lucky enough to be called by Francky who needed some help... Not knowing what it was about, on the phone I asked him if there was any money compensation involved (I was about to go surf...). By the end of the photoshoot, I was like:"Francky, thank you so much for thinking about me... please call me again next time! I'll pay you!!!"... that was one fun afternoon and the girls were stunning!"


Ok, back to the surf reporting, here's brother Josh enjoying a solo session on the south shore (that is until I joined him).


Sunset at Hookipa saw the usual head to overhead waves.


3am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
3.5ft @ 17s from 189° (S)

Lanai
3.5ft @ 15s from 199° (SSW)

Solid numbers at the buoy, it should be a great day of above average waves on the south shore. Yesterday morning Thousand Peaks was knee to waist high, but between 7.30 and 8 there was a flurry of 22s sets up to head high, often closing out the channel between the right and the main peak. That was bizarre, also because they disappeared afterwards. Nature never stop surprising.

NW101
6.3ft @ 11s from 349° (NNW)

Hanalei
4.2ft @ 12s from 338° (NNW)

Pauwela
4.5ft @ 9s from 58° (ENE)
3.8ft @ 11s from 51° (ENE)
 
Hilo
7.3ft @ 12s from 94° (E)
 
I believe those 3.8f 11s at Pauwela are the NW swell, but the direction indication is completely wrong because influenced by the strong windswell hitting it. The numbers at NW101 and Hanalei make me thing so. And also what Pat Caldwell says, confirming my comment about the underestimated forecast I did a couple of days ago: The swell arrived locally 10/9 about 2-3 feet higher than predicted by Wave Watch III. That's when observing the fetches can be better than the models. So between NW and windswell energy, plenty waves at Hookipa also today.
Hilo indicates a strong easterly swell from Sergio.

Wind map at noon.
 
North Pacific has a very weak small NW fetch, the windswell fetch and Sergio's.
 
Not much at all in the South Pacific.

Morning call

Tuesday, October 09, 2018

9am ukumehame still has knee to occasionally waist waves, but once in a long while there's a 22s set up to head high. Wind is whirling.

6.30am ukumehame has knee to occasionally waist high waves and light offshore. Hookipa looked like head high and a bit windy from the distance and without waiting for a set.

Tuesday 10 9 18 morning call

A longboard and a SUP foiling session for me yesterday on the knee to waist high waves of the south shore. The waves at Hookipa were in the head high range instead, we frequent bigger sets, as shown in this photo by Jimmie Hepp from this gallery.


Starting yesterday, you can occasionally see an ad for this blog on the Mama's and Paia bay's webcams. That used to be the cover of my book, thanks again to the artist Crix for it.
Please contact Ozolio if you have an ocean front home/business in Lahaina and want to host a webcam.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
3.1ft @ 15s from 222° (SW)                        
1.8ft @ 11s from 197° (SSW)

Lanai
2.4ft @ 15s from 197° (SSW)
0.9ft @ 20s from 198° (SSW)
 
Those are pretty good numbers at the local buoys, there should definitely be waves also today. I'll report around 6.30.
 
North Shore
NW101
7.2ft @ 12s from 317° (NW)
 
Hanalei
5.8ft @ 13s from 331° (NNW)
 
Hilo
5.1ft @ 13s from 99° (E)
 
Pauwela
5.9ft @ 9s from 61° (ENE)
3.2ft @ 14s from 66° (ENE)
 
NW swell on the rise at the buoys. Below is the graph of NW101, Hanalei and Pauwela, which suggest a steady rise all day today locally. I reported Hilo too to show that the E swell from Sergio is hitting there at 5f 13s. It's big enough to manage to wrap some and hit Pauwela too. It'll be interesting to how those sets look at Hookipa. One thing for sure, between rising NW, short period windswell and long period E, there should be no lack of waves there today.


Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has a NW fetch, the windswell one and Sergio's.


South Pacific has a fetch in the Tasman Sea.


Morning sky.