Friday, February 22, 2019

Friday 2 22 19 morning call

A longboard and a SUP foiling session for me yesterday.

Bernd Roediger took second place in the APP SUP contest at Sunset Beach a couple of days ago. Today he was testing gear at the harbor and put up an excellent display of different kind of skills. How's his ability to switch stance and still paddle like a machine while on the foil?


Finn Spencer glides one under the eyes of his brother Jeffrey.

Bruddah forgot-his-name was ripping.

Norm riding one of his shapes.

Randy on a gem.

Yasu.

Ralph Sifford told me he reads the blog regularly. I hope that inspired him to start learning SUP foiling. Whatever it was, I can see a grim on his face that means: "already hooked".

The inventive Brett Lickle came up (in collaboration with Jimmy Lewis who shaped the board) with an electric foil with a Wavejet motor pod, designed to catch the wave early pump up and foil without the drag of the motor like the other electric foils. Obviously, that propulsion should become zero as soon as the board lifts, but the drag will be zero too. The question is about the added weight of the board, the use of the Maliko 280 seems to indicate the need of big lift, but that might also be because of the small size of the waves on the south shore used for the test. Interesting nonetheless.


5am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
1.2ft @ 14s from 211° (SW)

Lanai
1ft @ 12s from 240° (WSW)
0.9ft @ 14s from 208° (SSW)
 
The one foot at 12s at Lanai could be still coming from the cyclone Oma by Vanuatu, but that other foot 14s at both Lanai and Barbers probably comes from the Tasman Sea fetch that is highlighted in the maps of Feb 14, 15 and 16 collaged below. Wherever they come from, the will make for more small waves on the south facing shores. Unfortunately, I keep not having reports from there.


The lack of a webcam in Lahaina doesn't help (please contact Ozolio if you have the possibility of hosting one). Ala Moana looks pretty flat, so my guess is nothing more than knee high.


North shore
Waimea
3ft @ 11s from 351° (N)

Mokapu
5.7ft @ 10s from 73° (ENE)

Pauwela
6ft @ 9s from 67° (ENE)

Waimea is the only buoy that registers a northerly reading different from all the other buoys, that instead only show easterly energy. That is because it's more protected by NE of Oahu, as shown in the map below. As you can see, Mokapu instead is on the east side, and even though exposed to the 351 direction registered by Waimea, only shows the easterly energy. We can say that Waimea shows the N because it has nothing else to show. The position of the buoys is obviously important to understand why they show what they show. A convenient larger scale map with the buoys position is offered by link n.0 of the GP's list of meteo websites.


Pauwela is also open to both those direction and only shows 6f 9s from 67, as that's the predominant energy in the water. Hookipa will have some waves too, but they should be smaller than the easterly exposures (which are once again the safest call), as its shadow line to the east rests around 65 degrees, as described in the epic post Buoys to Maui travel times and Maui's shadow lines.

Wind map at noon. Shoud be pretty calm all morning with clean conditions everywhere.


North Pacific has a sliver of NW fetch (red circle), which is backed up by a larger fetch that is oriented just SE of us. We might get a bit of angular spreading from it, but overall another day with very little wave generation for Hawaii. That will reflect into three days of marginally small waves (Saturday, Sunday and Monday). Surfline has 6ft 11s from 328 on Tuesday, but we haven't seen the fetch for that just yet. A much bigger NW swell is predicted to pick up Wednesday, peak on Thursday at 13.7ft 15s from 328 and gradually decline the next couple of days.


South Pacific has a remote fetch in the Tasman Sea.


Morning sky.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Thursday 2 21 19 morning call

A shortboard and two SUP foiling sessions for me yesterday. This is Annie Reickert's beautiful silhouette.


The harbor jetty had that perfect size for s-turning on a foil and Dave Kalama was graciously dancing with each single wave he caught. Unfortunately, I only decided to take a video of his last one, where he didn't have the freedom to use the whole wave, but the first couple of cutbacks should give you an idea of how much fun doing that is.


5am significant buoy readings
South shore
Lanai
1.6ft @ 13s from 240° (WSW)

The small westerly energy at Lanai described yesterday continues and I continue not having reports from the south shore, so I'm gonna guess very small waves might be on tap also today.

North shore
Waimea
2.6ft @ 12s from 331° (NNW)

Pauwela
8.6ft @ 10s from 79° (ENE)

I reported Waimea because it's the only buoy that registers some small NNW energy, but with 8.6ft @ 10s from 79° (ENE) at Pauwela, it's going to be hard to notice it. Easy call today, either Hookipa or any east facing shores. Wind should be calm till 10, when an 5-10 knots onshore breeze should pick up and blow all day.

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has a tiny west fetch, a NW one (but moving north) and a now weak E one. We can say that it's taking a little break as far as wave generation goes (which will result in small waves over the weekend), but it's not going to last long.


South Pacific has two relatively weak SSW and SSE fetches.


Morning sky.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

6.45 hookipa has head and a half plus waves that peak a bit randomly. Relatively clean faces.
6

Wednesday 2 20 19 morning call

A SUP foiling session for me yesterday. Below is the incredible sunset we were blessed with after the big rain. Photo by Jimmie Hepp.


The Haleakala might easily have some snow also this morning, so I thought of sharing this wonderful video shot by my friend Walter Niederkofler in the Dolomites. Hope you enjoy even if it's not surfing.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore
Lanai
1.9ft @ 13s from 274° (W)

Lanai has some westerly energy that Pat Caldwell suggests might be from this source:
WW3 suggests a pinch of swell coming from 240 degrees on 2/19. The source was tropical cyclonic activity near Vanuatu last week. The system formed into tropical cyclone Oma as it moved more into the shadow of SW Pacific islands 2/16-19. No surf beyond tiny to small is expected from 240 degrees this week.

As usual, I collaged the maps of Dec 15,16 and 17 to make it easier to spot the tiny fetch he's referring to. Wherever that comes from, it shouldn't make for waves more than knee high, but I don't have any fresh report from the south shores.


North shore
N
11.6ft @ 10s from 98° (E)

Mokapu
7.6ft @ 9s from 50° (NE)

Pauwela
8.9ft @ 10s from 58° (ENE)

All about easterly energy for a few days. Almost 9ft 10s from 58 will give the east facing shores well overhead waves. Seen the direction (58, but predicted to turn more east) Hookipa will have waves too and I will most likely post an early report. Last time I did that was Feb 7th. That's how long it has been since Hookipa has been surfable by the most. Complete lack of wind all morning should make for excellent conditions. No idea of the water quality.

Wind model is back, this is the noon map.


North Pacific has a E fetch. Not much brewing from the NW, but it'll change later this week.


South Pacific has a small SSE fetch.


Morning sky. We're out of the clouds.

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Tuesday 2 19 19 morning call

A SUP foiling and a longboard session for me yesterday. The harbor was the spot once again (this time not the only one, as other north shore spots started to become a bit smaller hence doable), here's George Foster in a picture by Chris Pagdilao, showing a very good centered stance.

Having a paddle in your hands and not using it should be a crime imo. Alex Aguera is not going to jail any time soon, as he touches the water with it at each single cut back.


On the opposite side of things, Jeremy Riggs built a custom thing (which I named Riggs' rig) to get rid of his paddle (and film from the back) while he's flying. Love how everybody is different and there's no absolute truths.


5am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
2.9ft @ 13s from 279° (W)

Lanai
2.2ft @ 13s from 269° (W)

West wrap (from the mistery NW swell discussed below, I guess) should make for another day of small waves on the Kihei and Lahaina side. Reports from yesterday said mostly knee high, occasionally bigger.

North shore
NW101
10.2ft @ 11s from 26° (NNE)

N
8.8ft @ 10s from 60° (ENE)
4.8ft @ 13s from 322° (NW)
 
Hanalei
8.6ft @ 11s from 38° (NE)
 
Waimea
8ft @ 11s from 1° (N)
 
Mokapu
7.8ft @ 10s from 40° (NE)
 
Pauwela
6.4ft @ 10s from 27° (NNE)
4.5ft @ 11s from 15° (NNE)
4.1ft @ 13s from 345° (NNW)
 
One thing that puzzled me yesterday (there were many) is: what happened to the NW swell? Today we see it at the N and Pauwela buoys, while it's probably masked by the N to NE readings at the other ones. We can say that there's multiple swells in the water, from NW to NE. Still early for the upcoming E one, which should start increasing gradually throughout the day and peak tomorrow afternoon at 11ft 10s from 89, according to Surfline.
Unfortunately, the wind is blowing at my house as I type, while the Kahului sensor only shows 5mph at 5.54am. It'll probably go up and down with the frequent squalls. Exposed spots might be allright in the lulls, otherwise seek for shelter.
 
Wind model still not updated, this is the much lower resolution (not as good) image from the graphic rendering of the NAM model at noon by Windy.com. Not strong, but dead onshore.
 
North Pacific has a E fetch. The NW one depicted in the map on the right is wide, but so weak that I didn't feel like circling it.
 
South Pacific has a tiny SSE fetch.
 
Morning sky shows plenty clouds.
 
And the radar shows plenty rain.

Monday, February 18, 2019

Monday 2 18 19 morning call

Two longboard sessions for me yesterday. Once again the harbor had plenty action and it was pretty much the only spot on the north shore. Unless you're Albee Layer and you can surf the bombs on the outside.




Those photos were taken by Chris Pagdilao, of whom I took this one.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore
Lanai
2.3ft @ 14s from 288° (WNW)
1.7ft @ 10s from 218° (SW)                        
0.9ft @ 11s from 202° (SSW)
 
Between the westerly wrap of the NW swell and those small 10-11s SW readings, there might be small waves also today on the south facing shores. Reports from Ukumehame yesterday were for knee high waves. Seen the readings at Pauwela, the Puamana area might easily get some northerly wrap wrap. To find out, check the west side webcams and try to guess from what you see. For example, this is a collage of the Napili Bay, Kaanapali point and Little Makaha webcams I took yesterday afternoon. They all had waves, which might be bigger today.



North shore
NW101
12.9ft @ 11s from 38° (NE)
 
N
8ft @ 15s from 335° (NNW)
7.6ft @ 10s from 89° (E)
 
Hanalei
11.1ft @ 12s from 45° (NE)
7ft @ 15s from 328° (NW)
 
Waimea
8.5ft @ 13s from 352° (N)
6.9ft @ 9s from 11° (NNE)
 
Pauwela
8.6ft @ 11s from 29° (NNE)
8ft @ 13s from 355° (N)
 
After a temporary shift more to the east, the NE energy associated with the fetch of the nearby low is now back to a more northerly direction (which is great for the harbor). I was a bit surprised about this, so I retrieved and collaged the fetch maps of Feb 15, 16 and 17 and noticed I failed to circle an important section of the fetch on the 16th. I now circled that fetch in green and that's what made what we see at Pauwela today. Notice how it quickly shifted to the east the day after and the related yellow fetch is going to miss Maui. That means: enjoy today, as that energy might be declining tomorrow replaced by the E energy of the red fetches I originally circled on the maps. We'll see, what counts is that this morning the waves will be clean everywhere as the wind is predicted to stay light all day.
 

Wind model still not updated (let's hope they fix it), this is the noon map of the NAM model. Should be light to no wind all day.


North Pacific has a WNW and a E fetch. The big blue one will completely miss us and send a massive swell to the Marshall islands.


South Pacific has a couple of small fetches.


Morning sky.

Sunday, February 17, 2019

Sunday 2 17 18 morning call

Two longboard sessions for me yesterday. I had literally 5 minutes to take photos and that's what I got. Enough to show that the waves in the harbor were fun once again.

Flash Austin taking a little rest between glides.


5am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
1ft @ 13s from 203° (SSW)

Lanai
1.5ft @ 11s from 213° (SW)

Once again, those readings at the buoys might keep the south facing shores from going completely flat, but barely. And once again, yesterday I completely forgot to mention the possibility of the NE swell to wrap down the west side coast. This is an image I captured from the Kaanapali Point webcam when the swell peaked at around 15ft 12s and it sure shows a pretty big wrap. How far did the wrap get, I have no idea. But I'm going to guess that there were small waves again in the Puamana area. Which means that there might be also today, although smaller since the NE swell is now down to 11.7ft 12s and about to go more east (less wrap).


North shore
NW101
8.8ft @ 15s from 349° (NNW)

N
12.4ft @ 12s from 77° (ENE)

Hanalei
12.8ft @ 13s from 56° (ENE)

Waimea
5.8ft @ 13s from 37° (NE)
5.4ft @ 10s from 38° (NE)
5.2ft @ 15s from 333° (NNW)
4.6ft @ 11s from 27° (NNE)

Pauwela
11.7ft @ 12s from 40° (NE)

Complex but interesting readings today. Below is the collage of the graphs of NW101, N, Waimea and Pauwela. On it I put an arrow to indicate that the NE swell peaked at the N buoy around 4am. 4+11=15, so you would expect the swell to have peaked in Maui around 3pm, instead it looks more like 2pm. Close enough, I'd say. What counts is that the swell is still elevated at 5am locally (11.7ft 12s from 40), but it's not much more E (77 degrees) at the N buoy, so we can expect that shift to happen also in Maui during the day (it follows the evolution the fetch had, so no surprise there).


But I also circled the new rising remotely generated NW energy at NW101 and Waimea. The fact that those are the only two buoys that show it confirms my theory that sometimes, some buoys can be "overwhelmed" by the other primary swells and not register other secondary ones (or that the Surfline algorithm to extract the data does not pick it up). If the swell is 5.2ft 15s at Waimea, of course there will be some NW energy also at Hanalei, but it just doesn't show because 12.8ft 13s from 56 is greatly predominant. Here's Pat Caldwell's explanation of the fetch history. Don't forget that the timing if for Oahu (roughly 4 hours later for Maui at 16s).

A hurricane-force low pressure system in the far NW Pacific 2/12-13 tracked slowly NNE. It weakened as it entered the western Bering Sea 2/14-15.
A long-wide fetch set up over the 305-320 degree band with highest seas 2/13 to near 40 feet beyond 2400 nm from Hawaii. The source zone stayed mostly west of 165E. The long travel distance lowers local surf potential.
Long-period forerunners from 305-315 degrees are expected locally Saturday afternoon 2/16. The event should be filled in by Sunday 2/17 dawn from 305-320 degrees a notch under the winter average. It should slowly drop Sunday night into Tuesday from the same direction. Marginal gales from 2/15 out near 170E could keep small breakers from 305-315 degrees on Wednesday.

Below is the collage of the maps of Feb 12, 13, 14 and 15 that might help following that.


In summary: the Maui waters will still have elevated NE swell that will turn more east during the day and a rising NW swell that Surfline predicts to be around 4ft 16s in the middle of the day. Plenty energy and waves to play with, with the most exposed breaks still too big for the common mortals, so seek for sheltered places again. What also counts is that the wind is finally going to be light all day. Thanks to the trade winds disrupting presence of the local low just north of Hawaii, it should actually stay light for the next 10 days, as the Windguru table below shows, but that can change a lot if the low moves a little compared to the model's output. Whatever it will be, don't you like the complete absence of bright colors and of the dreadful "windguru rating stars"? It just look pleasant to me and I'm sure also to the eyes who also readers prefer clean waves to the practice of wind related sports.


Wind model still didn't update, so this map is now more than three days old. Better than nothing.


North Pacific has a wide but really weak WNW fetch and a much closer E one.


Nothing from the South Pacific.


Morning sky and the counterclock circulation around the center of the local low.