Saturday, April 20, 2019

7.15am hookipa has a mix of windswell and leftover NNW in the head high range with occasional bigger sets. Wind and rain.
3.5

Saturday 4 20 19 morning call

The funding campaign for the new Lahaina harbor webcam has raised $1685. Thanks a lot and let's keep them coming. I'm gonna start my posts with an update like this until it reaches its goal of $2,000. Please donate to the page, not to me. I have nothing to do with this campaign, other than the fact that I totally support the cause.

Three shortboard and one longboard session for me yesterday. I was off and I knew this was going to be one of the last days of good waves, so I milked it till my arms dropped. This is how Honolua looked when I arrived after my first Hookipa session: head high and building. I hit the water right away.

In the afternoon the swell built up to an extremely fun head and a half size.

Most likely, he's going to have to wait until next winter for a vision like that. Once again, you never know. There'll be plenty more swells on the north shore of course, but you guys know how picky the Bay is with direction, size, period and everything else.

Let's now jump to Jimmie Hepp's windsurfing shots. He was celebrating 10 years of shooting Hookipa. On this blog I've been posting photos of it (and everything else) since 2005 and when Jimmie came along I was very relieved: finally someone else was posting shots on a "free" site (Facebook) and with a much better camera, so that I didn't have to do it! Thank you Jimmie for your hard work.
This is my wave-based pick of his gallery of the day.

Today I also had to pick one based on the move. Guadalupe's Antoine Martin is the most entertaining windsurfer in the world in my opinion. His skills are mad and he's mad too! This is a backloop off the lip (which means he's riding the wave, hitting the lip and throwing a backloop in front of it. A maneuver of a degree of difficulty I can't even grasp. You land one like this in a contest, it's an automatic 10.


Back to my sessions, here's a couple of gropro shots on two different super duper "secret" lefts. Good luck with the guessing!



4am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
1.5ft @ 14s from 202° (SSW)

Lanai
1.5ft @ 13s from 229° (SW)

Background energy still there. Yesterday the Lahaina side was tiny (but not flat) and judging from what I see at the Kihei webcam, this is going to be the case also today. Very soon the Lahaina cam will be online, please keep the donations coming.

North shore
NW101
2.3ft @ 11s from 344° (NNW)
2.1ft @ 10s from 336° (NNW)

Hanalei
2.4ft @ 11s from 345° (NNW)

Waimea
2ft @ 11s from 331° (NNW)

Pauwela
5.3ft @ 8s from 80° (E)
3.9ft @ 11s from 332° (NNW)
 
Below is the graph of Pauwela together with yesterday's Surfline forecast. You can see how the swell peaked earlier than the forecast, so today we can expect much smaller size than yesterday afternoon and declining. That is also confirmed by the readings of all the upstream buoys. Make good use if it, because after that it's going to me mostly windswell (with some possible low NW energy here and there) for at least a couple of weeks.


Wind map at noon.


North Pacific only has a weak windswell fetch.

Nothing of relevance from the south either, pretty horrible day of wave generation for Hawaii. That's totally normal, in the transition seasons (fall and spring) you can have both sides of the Pacific firing or both of them dormant.

Morning sky.

Friday, April 19, 2019

6.45am hookipa is chest to occasionally head high and light trades.
4.5

Friday 4 19 19 morning call

The funding campaign for the new Lahaina harbor webcam has raised $1685. Thanks a lot and let's keep them coming. I'm gonna start my posts with an update like this until it reaches its goal of $2,000. Please donate to the page, not to me. I have nothing to do with this campaign, other than the fact that I totally support the cause.

A longboard session for me yesterday. This is my pick of Jimmie Hepp's daily gallery of the windsurfing action at Hookipa. That wave is well above the average of the day.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
1ft @ 14s from 229° (SW)

Lanai
1ft @ 14s from 188° (S)

Background energy still at the local south facing buoys. Kihei cam doesn't show much, so I'm going to call the usual flat to knee high.

North shore
NW101
6ft @ 12s from 336° (NNW)

Hanalei
4.6ft @ 13s from 337° (NNW)

Waimea
2.1ft @ 14s from 325° (NW)

Pauwela
4.9ft @ 8s from 62° (ENE)
1.7ft @ 5s from 79° (ENE)
1.4ft @ 14s from 349° (NNW)
1.2ft @ 12s from 343° (NNW)
 
New NNW swell on the rise all day. Below is the collage of the graphs of the reported buoys plus the Surfline forecast. The red line indicates the peak at the NW buoy, which happened around 8pm. At 12s, it takes 20h to get here, so we can expect this swell to peak right at sunset, which is pretty much also what the Surfline forecast shows. Early morning will still be pretty small and the very low tide at 8.25am won't help, but it will still be bigger than yesterday, probably with head high sets. I might post a Hookipa beach report before 7am. Quite possibly, this is the last opportunity of the season to surf Honolua, but you never know.


Wind map at noon.


Tiny WNW fetch in the North Pacific.


South Pacific has a massive fetch oriented towards Central America, hopefully we'll get some angular spreading.


Morning sky.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

7.30am hookipa is waist to occasionally chest high with light trades.
3

Thursday 4 18 19 morning call

The funding campaign for the new Lahaina harbor webcam has raised $1685. Thanks a lot and let's keep them coming. I'm gonna start my posts with an update like this until it reaches its goal of $2,000. Please donate to the page, not to me. I have nothing to do with this campaign, other than the fact that I totally support the cause.

A longboard session for me yesterday. This photo shows the biggest wave of the whole daily gallery by Jimmie Hepp. It was mostly head high instead, and it will be even smaller today.


Here's a downwind foiler that looks like Kody Kerbox on a MFC foil.


Talking about which, I'm happy to announce that after having waited for almost a year, we finally have those in stock at Hi-Tech. Two sizes, this is the biggest one. Wonderful finish.


4-5am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
1ft @ 15s from 197° (SSW)

Lanai
0.8ft @ 15s from 194° (SSW)

It's always a good sign when both the local south facing buoys show something, but in this case the reality is that it's tiny. Knee high was as big as I saw yesterday on the Lahaina side, maybe also because of the very low morning tide. Ala Moana cam is down, I'm looking at Kihei and I didn't see a single set. Flat to knee high again is my call.

North shore
Hanalei
1.8ft @ 10s from 335° (NNW)                         
1.3ft @ 11s from 325° (NW)
 
Waimea
1.5ft @ 11s from 310° (WNW)                        
1.3ft @ 9s from 333° (NNW)

Pauwela
3.4ft @ 8s from 63° (ENE)
2.3ft @ 5s from 70° (ENE)
1.4ft @ 11s from 326° (NW)
1.1ft @ 12s from 323° (NW)

The NW energy is almost completely gone and the windswell is barely noticeable and that will make for close to flat conditions at Hookipa and everywhere else on the north shore.

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific haw three scattered small WNW-NW fetches. Nothing to be excited about. Spring is finally in the air. Every time it feels like that... "gosh, where did the winter go?". But this time a little bit less, I have to say, as I squeezed as many sessions as I could out of it. And I hope you guys did too with the help of this blog.


South Pacific today offers a not particularly intense but fairly wide fetch. Pat Caldwell wrote: Hawaii should see a long-lived spell of surf of at least upper-end background levels with peak days near to slightly above average within 4/23-30 from 170-190 degrees.
We'll take it!


Morning sky.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

6.30am lahaina side is flat to knee high and clean everywhere. Hookipa looked relatively small and windy in the dark and from the distance.

Wednesday 4 17 19 morning call

The funding campaign for the new Lahaina harbor webcam has raised $1640. Thanks a lot and let's keep them coming. I'm gonna start my posts with an update like this until it reaches its goal of $2,000. Please donate to the page, not to me. I have nothing to do with this campaign, other than the fact that I totally support the cause.

A longboard and a shortboard session for me yesterday. This is Dave Kalama foiling in the harbor in marginal conditions that could have been enjoyed pretty much only by SUP foilers (too small for prone foilers, let alone regular surfers).


3am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
1ft @ 16s from 215° (SW)

Lanai
1ft @ 13s from 215° (SW)
0.9ft @ 16s from 202° (SSW)
 
Older background energy keeps steady at Lanai with 1ft 13s while new 16s one fills in. I had a report of knee to waist high waves at Thousand Peaks yesterday. Today it should be at least the same, if not more.
 
The Surfline forecast calls for flat instead, and doesn't even report this energy, but it's obviously wrong. Below is the collage of the maps of April 9, 10 and 11 that shows the fetch responsible for the new energy (red arrow).


North shore
NW101
2.6ft @ 11s from 301° (WNW)
 
Hanalei
3.2ft @ 12s from 314° (NW)
 
Waimea
3.2ft @ 13s from 319° (NW)
 
Pauwela
3.9ft @ 8s from 64° (ENE)
3.1ft @ 12s from 320° (NW)
3ft @ 5s from 82° (E)
 
Both the NW energy and the windswell are trending down and today (and even more tomorrow) should be a relatively small day on the north shore (Hookipa still probably head high this morning). Below is the graph of Pauwela together with the Surfline forecast. Look how in this case the two graphs are very similar instead.
 
 
Wind map at noon. Should be fairly calm till 8ish.
 
North Pacific has a couple of weak NW fetches.
 
South Pacific still pretty active with multiple fetches both directly oriented towards us (red circles) and slightly to our east (blue circle, enough for angular spreading). The most intense one is one deepest south that is off the map on the right, but circled in red in the one on the left. Next week should be pretty good on the south shores.
 
Morning sky.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

6.15am hookipa has head to head and a half relatively clean waves. The windswell still in the water creates multiple sub peaks and ribs on the face. Low consistency.
6.5

Tuesday 4 186 19 morning call

The funding campaign for the new Lahaina harbor webcam has raised $1640. Thanks a lot and let's keep them coming. I'm gonna start my posts with an update like this until it reaches its goal of $2,000. Please donate to the page, not to me. I have nothing to do with this campaign, other than the fact that I totally support the cause.

Another day of rest for me, here's my pick of Jimmie Hepp's gallery of the windsurfing action at Hookipa. As you can see, the new NW swell did fill in in the afternoon, although inconsistent as it is in the nature of the beginning of distantly generated swells.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore
Lanai
1ft @ 14s from 210° (SSW)

Background energy pretty steady at the buoy, shouldn't be flat today either.

North shore
NW001
4.1ft @ 12s from 307° (WNW)

Hanalei
4ft @ 14s from 325° (NW)

Waimea
3.4ft @ 14s from 312° (NW)

Pauwela
4.7ft @ 9s from 62° (ENE)
3.6ft @ 15s from 321° (NW)
2.8ft @ 6s from 50° (NE)
 
Fun size numbers at the buoys, as usual what really counts is the wind which this morning, for a change, will be calm. Below is the graph of Pauwela together with its energy Spectrum that shows some kind of small energy all the way from 270 to 105 (Maui is an island and it's open to many directions). The red spot indicates the highest energy which comes from directions between 300 and 315. Should be a fun morning, I'll report from Hookipa before 7am.


Wind map at noon. Should be calm everywhere till 9ish.


North Pacific has a couple of NW fetches, the bigger of which will give life to a swell that Surfline predicts to peak Friday night at 5ft 12s from 330.


South Pacific has a remarkably large fetch. Surfline calls for 2.3ft 14s in a week, I hope for a little more.


Morning sky.

Monday, April 15, 2019

Monday 4 15 19 morning call

The funding campaign for the new Lahaina harbor webcam has raised $1640. Thanks a lot and let's keep them coming. I'm gonna start my posts with an update like this until it reaches its goal of $2,000. Please donate to the page, not to me. I have nothing to do with this campaign, other than the fact that I totally support the cause.

Uninspiring conditions led to a rest day for me yesterday. I picked this photo out of Jimmie Hepp's gallery of the day, as it still shows a wave of pretty solid size, but the windswell waves did go down a bit at Hookipa.


3am significant buoy readings
South shore
Lanai
1ft @ 13s from 191° (SSW)

1ft 13s at the Lanai buoy should make for tiny background waves on the south shore again.

North shore
NW001
2.8ft @ 17s from 322° (NW)

Hanalei
1.8ft @ 18s from 313° (NW)

Waimea
0.9ft @ 20s from 313° (NW)

Pauwela
7.2ft @ 9s from 64° (ENE)
3.3ft @ 11s from 59° (ENE)
2.6ft @ 3s from 73° (ENE)
0.5ft @ 20s from 317° (NW)

Windswell still holding up to decent numbers, but on the steady decline at Pauwela. Below is the collage of the graphs of the reported buoys together with the Surfline forecast. I circled the new long period NW swell that will slowly rise throughout the day. I also put an arrow on the graphical representation of this new swell on the forecast (orange line). That is 12pm and the value is 0.5ft 20s, which is what we have instead already at 3am. We can conclude that the Surfline forecast is a bit late (which is much more true than saying "the swell arrived early").

How big is it going to get today? Let's see! 2.8ft 17s at the NW buoy at 3am will take roughly 15h to get here, so that's 6pm. 1.8ft 18s at Hanalei will take 7 hours instead, so that's 10am. 0.9ft 20s at Waimea will take 3h, so that's 6am. All those travel times are conveniently reported in the post Buoys to Maui travel times and Maui's shadow lines.

1ft 20s can easily make for head high waves at Hookipa, so the swell, although inconsistent, should be noticeable already at dawn. It would obviously be easier to notice if there were no other swells in the water. Instead, as pointed out, there's still plenty energy from the windswell, which will provide still most of the waves for the whole morning. I'm calling for overhead sets in the afternoon at Hookipa from this swell, with low but slowly increasing consistency. This swell might peak during the night, but tomorrow morning there will be some pretty good surfing conditions, thanks to one day of lighter winds.


Below is the collage of the fetch maps of April 11, 12 and 13. As you can see, the storm started in a pretty west position (just offshore Japan) and then it moved NE. Not the best track at all, and not a particularly big fetch, but the wind intensity was there, and that, combined with the distance, is the reason for the long period energy.


Below is the Windguru table for the next 10 days. Windguru doesn't do any forecast at all. They just put together in a brilliant way (always been a fan of that table) the output of various wind models. They also have a line for the wave forecast, which they take (like every other website) from the NOAA WW3. I don't have time to double check the WW3 output myself, but 7ft 18s at 11am is just ridiculously high. And that happens all the time. My suggestion is: don't look at the wave forecast on it. Do look at the long term wind forecast instead, which is why I also post it. After a relatively lighter day tomorrow, we're going to have many more days of easterly trades. East MUCH better than NE for the early morning surfing, so that could be worse. I like the straight east also for the Lahaina side better and there will be some action in the second part of the week over there too.


Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has a NW fetch and the almost disappeared windswell one.


South Pacific offers a proper S fetch. The waves being generated in there will get here in about a week.


Morning sky.

Sunday, April 14, 2019

Sunday 4 14 19 morning call

The funding campaign for the new Lahaina harbor webcam has raised $1595. Thanks a lot and let's keep them coming. I'm gonna start my posts with an update like this until it reaches its goal of $2,000. Please donate to the page, not to me. I have nothing to do with this campaign, other than the fact that I totally support the cause.

Two shortboard sessions for me yesterday. This drop is from the first one.


Mark hits the lip.


The Payzel sold quickly, so I pulled out this old trusty Rusty out of the rack. Forgot how quick and reactive a light epoxy board can be.


This is my pick of Jimmie Hepp's gallery of the day, which holds the answer to yesterday's question: 10ft 12s make for bigger waves at Hookipa than 8ft 8s, despite the more easterly direction of around 65-75. But there was also that NW energy in the water, so it's hard to tell. Oh well, missed opportunity to learn something. But it's thanks to this kind of analysis that one builds the personal database of info called "local knowledge". In my opionion, none of the automated near shore models of any forecast website will be more accurate than something that has been regularly empirically observed.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore
No indication of southerly energy at the buoys. Yesterday it was tiny but not flat. Probably similar today.

North shore
Waimea
4.1ft @ 11s from 358° (N) 

Pauwela
7.6ft @ 11s from 62° (ENE)
6.7ft @ 8s from 66° (ENE)
 
Once again the only buoy showing northerly energy is Waimea, the others are too exposed to the windswell to record it. OR the Surfline software that extracts the energy of the different swells disregards it. To try to give an answer to this disquieting dilemma, below are the spectrum plots of the two reported buoys. Also from this source, it seems that Pauwela doesn't really feel much from the NW, even though there is a little area (that I circled in red) of higher energy from the NW.
Shall we blame the buoys and make official my theory that they struggle registering small swells if there's a big one (specially a nearby generated very consistent one) in the water at the same time?
Whatever, as long as we know the fact, I don't care what's the cause.
 
But let me point out another big difference between these plots and the Surfline buoys readings: the direction. 358 at Waimea is extremely suspicious because, as we saw yesterday on the fetch maps collage, the fetch never really even crossed the date line. And in fact, the plot suggests instead a direction around 300-315, which is much more in line with the fetch position. So, if we assume that these plots are more reliable than the Surfline buoys direction indication, that also means that today's 62 degrees direction of the windswell at Pauwela is quite wrong, as the plot suggests 75-90 instead.
The same plot yesterday indicated 65-75, let's see if we can detect that in the water today (Hookipa should be quite a bit smaller) and learn something new. Oh dear, that would mean more diagrams to analyze every morning...
Never stop learning and, btw, I heard that Honolua had waves yesterday, just to prove me wrong...

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific offers a NW and the windswell fetch. The first one is pretty weak, but it should get stronger tomorrow.


South Pacific offers a couple of decent fetches.


Morning sky.