Sunday, June 23, 2019

Sunday 6 23 19 morning call

Sunsets have been amazing lately, the only way you didn't notice would be if you are not in Maui.


Didn't take many photos at all, this is one of Kane to illustrate the size (and very poor shape) of the waves at Hookipa, which were in the chest to shoulder high range with very occasional head highers. I watched from the cliff and, spoiled after weeks of Lahaina perfection, decided to go for a swim.
"Do I really surf this place during the winter?!?" was the question I had in my mind.



3am significant buoy readings
Barbers
1.1ft @ 14s from 185° (S)
1.1ft @ 11s from 170° (S)

Lanai
1.3ft @ 12s from 179° (S)
0.8ft @ 16s from 206° (SSW)
 
Lahaina side "finally" taking the break I've been calling way too early. Even yesterday it looked pretty good all day on the webcam and even today, if you wait long enough, you get sets like this one below. Check the webcam and decide. As you can see, the Hookipa alternative in the bottom half of the screen is not too exciting.
 
North shore
Hilo
4.5ft @ 9s from 67° (ENE)
 
A bunch of buoys disappeared from the Surfline page, Hilo says 4.5ft 9s from 67 and that's probably what we have in the water also locally. Below is the collage of the maps of June 18 and 19, the ones with the stronger NE fetches. Waves should be in the same yesterday's range I described up top, even though I have the feeling that the peak was yesterday at sunset. Eastern exposures will have waves too.
 
The wind should be calm every where until mid morning. Below is the map at 8am.
 
Wind map at noon shows the usual thermals, but no real trades.
 
North Pacific has practically nothing.


South Pacific's strong fetch keeps looking like the one of last weekend's big swell. I'm really curious to see what this one is going to do in a week. Still learning about the angular spreading.


Morning sky.

Saturday, June 22, 2019

Saturday 6 22 19 morning call

Another fun day on the south shore yesterday. No photos, here's a video by Dan Taylor of Destination 360 of Austin Kalama SUP foil downwinding in the Gorge .


5am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
0.9ft @ 16s from 194° (SSW)

Lanai
1.5ft @ 13s from 182° (S)

South swell down to 1.5ft 13s at Lanai, no idea of where that 16s reading at Barbers comes from, my guess is that is a glitch. After another fantastic week of action (pretty uncrowded too, as most people were happy/tired with the big swell of last weekend and/or weren't aware of the other pulses), this weekend the Lahaina side breaks are going to take a... break. Sizes are small at the moment, but cleanness and quality is stellar as usual and there's occasional still over waist sets (like the one in the photo). Check the webcam and decide.



North Pacific
N
5.2ft @ 10s from 64° (ENE)

Mokapu
3.2ft @ 8s from 83° (E)

Hilo
3.7ft @ 8s from 86° (E)
2.6ft @ 11s from 72° (ENE)

North buoy is feeling the new and expected 10s ENE swell, Hilo starting to feel it too, Mokapu not yet. From the post Buoys to Maui travel times and Maui's shadow lines, we learn that the travel time for a swell from 42 degrees is 13 hours (at 10s). This swell is from around 64 degrees up there, so it might be a little less than that. In the N buoy graph below I circled the swell (blue line, completely different from the orange one which is from straight E, as shown in the lower part), which appeared to be picking up yesterday around 6pm, so it should start picking up any time soon. Still pretty small at the moment, but no wind at all for a while, so there's hopes for a mid morning fun session at Hookipa and the east facing shores.


Wind map at noon.


North Pacific doesn't have much.


Today's map is the one on the right. Unfortunately, the fetches maps that are available at the moment don't have the isobars as the old ones (hopefully back soon), so we can't see how far the fetches that are not directly oriented towards us are from the great circle rays. But that strong fetch south of New Zealand (black arrow) looked familiar, so I retrieved the map of June 11 and stuck to its left. That was the fetch that originated the lovely angular spreading swell we just enjoyed in the last three days, so there's hope that this one will do something similar too. As a matter of fact, the Surfline forecast, after calling pretty flat all this coming week, does support this theory with a long period swell picking up in the next weekend (end of June).



Morning sky.

Friday, June 21, 2019

Friday 6 21 19 morning call

Yesterday morning Lahaina town looked like the Mentawais with shoulder to head high glassy perfection until around 8.30am. One of the best sessions of the south shore season, but there's been so many already this year it's hard to believe it. Not only we had plenty swells, but also perfect light easterly trades that made the onshore flow on the other side pick up later than usual or not at all.

I haven't seen much red in the Windguru table for months and very little orange too. Blue and green are the colors you want to see in it, for the weather in Maui to be the best for every discipline everywhere, included the wind related ones (with the only exception are the downwinders), in my opinion at least. Looks like we got some orange coming up next weekend, but that's still far away.


A board that Kei Penny would like.


3/4am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
1.6ft @ 15s from 184° (S)

Lanai
2.1ft @ 14s from 186° (S)
2ft @ 9s from 178° (S)
1.2ft @ 11s from 181° (S)

2ft 14s is my favorite numbers for Lahaina and it looks like it's gonna be another really fun day on that side. Check the webcam and decide.


North shore
Mokapu
3.6ft @ 8s from 80° (E)

Pauwela is officially down, with that reading at Mokapu, Hookipa is going to be flat to tiny again, but there should be small NE bump during the weekend, which is when the south shore should be down to minimal levels.

North Pacific has a weak NE fetch.


South Pacific has a perfectly positioned but weak fetch (only 20-25knots inside).


Morning sky.

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Thursday 6 20 19 morning call

The waves were once again awesome on the Lahaina side, but I'm gonna open the call with a photo of my buddy Russ who competed in the IWT Oregon Pistol River windsurfing contest. More info and results on their website.


This is the local photo of the day instead. I showed Randy (a notoriously funny guy) this picture I had just taken of him and asked him for a caption. He didn't disappoint and came up with:
"Foiling is fun, butt..."


4am significant buoy readings
Barbers
1.9ft @ 15s from 185° (S)

Lanai (3am)
2.3ft @ 17s from 189° (S)

Still really good numbers also today at the buoys, it seems that this angular spreading swell is holding up much better than expected. This is a gorgeous head high wave I caught as soon as I launched the webcam. I give it a 10. Check the webcam yourself before going.


North shore
Mokapu
3.5ft @ 8s from 91° (E)

Pauwela disappeared from the Surfline page, that is the windswell at Mokapu. Hookipa should be flat to tiny.

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has a NE fetch again. 4ft 9s from 52 predicted on Sunday by Surfline. Not much to be excited about really, but much better than flat nonetheless.


South Pacific has a couple of small fetches.


Morning sky.

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Wednesday 6 19 19 morning call

This is an image by Ben Thouard showing Matahi Drollet at Teahupoo.


3am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
2.2ft @ 8s from 159° (SSE)
1.2ft @ 18s from 180° (S)
1ft @ 13s from 185° (S)
0.9ft @ 11s from 193° (SSW)

Lanai
2.9ft @ 8s from 167° (SSE)
1.7ft @ 13s from 177° (S)
1.4ft @ 6s from 145° (SE)
1.1ft @ 18s from 189° (S)

Usually I filter the readings and only post the ones that I consider to be significant (the long period southerly ones). But the amount of cross chop in the all the Lahaina side lineups yesterday made me think that maybe it was that short period SSE windswell I had ignored (but I doubt it), so today I'm posting all the readings. The windswell is still there, let's see if the cross chop will be still there.

As far as rideable waves go, we have the old S swell steadily trickling down but still showing 1.7ft 13s at Lanai and the new long period one clocking in at a couple of inches over 1 foot and 18s. Here's how Pat Caldwell described the fetch:
A storm-force low pressure tracked east hugging the Antarctic ice sheet to the S to SE of New Zealand 6/11-12. Surface winds were zonal, or west to east, aiming swell toward the Americas. Angular spreading could bring low, long-period surf to Hawaii starting Tuesday. Surf should be within background to average levels at the peak late Tuesday into Wednesday from 175-190 degrees.
Background level surf from the remnant of the long-period event and from trades in the southern hemisphere should be the rule for Thursday into the weekend.

Unfortunately that confirms my initial impression that after today, the rest of the week looks pretty meager. So check the webcam and go get them now. Long period and angular spreading should mean very low consistency in the long period sets. This is an image I just grabbed, at least is nice and glassy, unlike yesterday.


North shore
Mokapu
4.2ft @ 6s from 83° (E)

Pauwela is down (at least on the Surfline buoy page), but we can look at Mokapu for the windswell. Should be pretty similar here, hence flat to tiny again at Hookipa (windy alredy before dawn).

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has a pretty elongated NE fetch.


South Pacific has small/weak fetches here and there.


Morning sky.

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Tuesday 6 18 19 morning call

Beautiful waves still up to shoulder high yesterday on the south shore. Don't have a photo of the day, here's an aerial view of Chicama in Peru. I've been there, but I would love to go back to foil it, as it's a relatively soft and extremely long wave.


3am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
1.7ft @ 14s from 187° (S)                        
0.4ft @ 22s from 189° (S)

Lanai
2.1ft @ 15s from 179° (S)

South swell still pretty decent at the buoys, couple of feet 14s. Notice also the 0.4ft 22s reading at Barbers, which is the start of a brand new long period swell. Below is the collage of the maps of June 10, 11 and 12. The fetch south of New Zealand is the source. Depending how long it lasts (and I think it will last at least 3-4 days), it might prove my previous statement of a flat second half of this week wrong. We'll see, I'd be happy if that happens.


The buoys don't tell the whole story, as they give no information about the consistency, which appears to be really fading on the webcam. That's why you should always check the webcam before going. Definitely smaller than yesterday, we should call it a transition day. It also looks a bit less glassy than usual and I'm gonna blame the stronger trades we have today, as they're usually the cause of the onshore flow over there. The extremely low tide at 9.30am will kill the size even more.


North shore
Pauwela
4.8ft @ 8s from 90° (E)

Only windswell at Pauwela and from straight east, Hookipa will be flat to tiny (and it's windy already).

Wind map at noon.


The great circle rays maps are not available, North Pacific only has the windswell fetch for us.


South Pacific has a California shaped medium strength fetch east of New Zealand.


Morning sky.

Monday, June 17, 2019

Monday 6 17 19 morning call

Another gorgeous day of surfing on the south side, despite the fact that the best photo I could come up with is this (didn't take many).


Hookipa had a little more size than yesterday. Japanese sailor Yoshi has been visiting Maui since ages and he's 73 years old! I picked this shot out of this gallery from Jimmie Hepp. It's also the biggest wave in it.


4am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
1.9ft @ 15s from 181° (S)

Lanai
1.8ft @ 15s from 183° (S)

South swell going down and more south, but those are still magic numbers at some spots. Well, looks like the harbor is obviously one of them. But never trust a single image, check the webcam yourself.


North shore
Waimea
2.8ft @ 10s from 330° (NW)

Pauwela
3.8ft @ 6s from 76° (ENE)
3.6ft @ 8s from 81° (E)
1.6ft @ 11s from 330° (NW)

NW swell still barely in the local waters, but disappeared completely at the NW and Hanalei buoy. There's still some waves breaking at Hookipa this morning, but the orange line of the Pauwela graph below clearly shows the down trend. I think the windsurfers got very lucky yesterday that the peak of this bump was right in the middle of the day.


Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has a weak NW fetch.


South Pacific has a new small but well positioned fetch just east of New Zealand. Could make for a small, under the radar swell in a week.


Morning sky.

Sunday, June 16, 2019

Sunday 6 16 19 morning call

Yesterday was a terrific day of surfing on the south shore. The period was 18s in the morning and 17 in the afternoon and that made most spots close out. But if you knew where to go... oh my goodness. The wind was perfect all morning and my first session was a clear 10.

Afterwards, I went to the GoFoil demo at Thousand Peaks and tried a couple of new wings. There's something special about trying a new foil. The excitement of finding out how it's going to fly is much more intense for me than the one I feel when I try a new surfboard. Not sure what it is, maybe it's just that I haven't tried as many foils as I have tried surfboards. Or maybe it's just that first sip of beer again!

This is a short interview Jason Hall asked me for right after my wing tests. He also shot a video at the meeting at Hi-Tech the day before, in which Alex Aguera introduces the new line of GoFoil wings.

BTW, that weird hook I have on my right hand is a weight lifting tool I found online, and I use it to alleviate the pressure on my trigger fingers when I paddle back out to catch another wave. Pretty effective for that, I'd say. When I paddle for a wave instead, I leave it dangling off the wrist.


I didn't have time to take any photos, as I had to be at work at 2pm, but I promise I'll take some today.

Jimmie Hepp went to Hookipa where the windsurfers seemed to have listened to my advice to go enjoy the small waves (not true: they would have gone anyway!), and this is my pick out of this gallery.



3am significant buoy readings
South shore
Barbers
2.8ft @ 13s from 304° (WNW)
2.4ft @ 16s from 189° (S)

Lanai
3ft @ 15s from 192° (SSW)

Not sure how to comment on the WNW reading at Barbers, so I won't. But I don't think it matters. What matters are the south swell readings and Lanai shows a beautiful 3ft 15s. Period went down a bit, as it usually does, so today we can expect slightly smaller sizes (but not by much) and a lit less tendency to close out. In other words, it should be another great day of surfing on the south shore.
Check out this head high beauty at the harbor. But also check out the webcam yourself.


North shore
NW101
3.3ft @ 10s from 336° (NNW)

Hanalei
2.5ft @ 11s from 329° (NW)
2.5ft @ 10s from 334° (NNW)

Waimea
3ft @ 13s from 325° (NW)

Pauwela
4ft @ 8s from 91° (E)
3.4ft @ 6s from 84° (E)
1.8ft @ 12s from 320° (NW)

Tiny numbers at the local buoy, it seems that the last couple of medium period NW swells just lost a lot of power as they moved down the island chain. Can't see anything at the moment in the cam, I'm going to call another waist to occasional shoulder high day from home.

Wind map at noon.


North Pacific has a very weak NW fetch and a tiny WNW one associated with an interesting new low forming over Japan.


South Pacific doesn't offer anything of relevance for the third day in a row. Expect the second half of this week to go pretty flat.


Morning sky.