Monday, March 17, 2008

Mikey Dread

After Lucky Dube, another of my favorite reggae artists died.

Here is Mikey Dread's most famous song. I heard this song hundreds of times, but those trumpets at the end always give me the shivers...



And here's a biography I found on a forum.

Radio disc jock Mikey Dread is dead. He succumbed to a brain tumour late yesterday afternoon at his family home in Connecticut, USA at the age of 54. Born Michael Campbell in Port Antonio, Jamaica, he distinguished himself as an extraordinary studio engineer and presenter at the now defunct Jamaica Broadcasting Corporation (JBC) where he came to prominence in the 1970s as "The Dread-the-Control Tower", the name of the late night show he presented at a time when reggae music was scoffed at by many.
Mikey Dread... hailed as one of reggae's greatest innovators One of reggae's greatest innovators and original radio engineers/technicians, the past student of Titchfield High School, in
2006 celebrated the 30th anniversary of the night programme which he started at the JBC, and revolutionised the after midnight shift making it into the most popular slot on radio, by playing strictly dub music. This innovation is seen by many musicologists as the antecedence of dancehall as we now know it.
Upon leaving the JBC, Mikey Dread ventured into recording and scored with a number of releases such as Weatherman Skanking in combination with Ray I, Barber Saloon, Love the Dread, as well as albums such as Dread at the Control, Evolutionary Rockers and World War III. Over time he attracted the attention of British punk rockers, The Clash, who invited him to produce some of their music, the most famous of which is their single Bankrobber, and contributed to several songs on their 1980 album, Sandinista. Mikey Dread also toured with The Clash across Britain, wider Europe and the US.
He also worked closely with producer Trevor Elliot to launch musical career of singer Edi Fitzroy, who was then an accountant at the JBC. As the news of his passing surfaced yesterday, the Sunday Observer got comments from a number of persons in the media and the music fraternity, all of whom hailed Mikey Dread as a significant contributor to the development of Jamaican music. "His (Mikey Dread's) work, is not only national or regional, but also international," former JBC's journalist Leslie Miles noted. "It spanned the world scene and made Mikey a pioneer broadcaster for playing dub music, and also redefined aspects of radio, especially night time radio" Miles, who is now head of news at Bess FM, also spoke of the struggle Mikey Dread faced at the conservative JBC. Music consultant Colin Leslie pointed out that the consequence of the "fight" he received from the management was putting him on at night, but that backfired.
"Remember he is a Portlander, so I always appreciated the fact that we shared the same alma mater (Titchfield High School), that is something I've always cherished and I hold him in high esteem. Although he was ahead of my era, he was somebody who laid an awesome foundation and was very unique and highly respected," was how Richard "Richie B" Burgess of Hot 102, remembered Mikey Dread.
"We were at JBC together, and in those days when he started at the JBC dreads weren't popular on the air. The powers that be in management really gave him a fight," Ali McNab told the Sunday Observer.
"Michael Campbell, is someone who revolutionised radio in Jamaica when there was still an anti-Jamaican sentiment regarding music and culture. In terms of the emerging dancehall, it was Mikey Dread who popularised it on radio. Although it was late night, he still managed to popularise dancehall music and bring it to the masses," was the perspective of Dennis Howard who also worked on JBC Radio, in the post-Mikey Dread era.
And Irie FM's disc jockey, GT Taylor hailed the late Mikey Dread as a role model. "Reggae music in Jamaica, owes a lot that that brother. He was one man who stood up for reggae in the early '70s, bringing the music to the forefront. He is one of my inspirations."
Veteran singer Freddie McGregor attested to the fact that "Mikey Dread was one of the persons fighting the struggle for reggae music. Mikey and I did a lot of shows together over the years. A wonderful brethren".

4 comments:

horndog said...

just like marley and tosh. too much spleeef, mon!

what happened to katia? post some pics to cheer us all up, brah!

Sharon said...

Ba da ba dahhhhhhhh, ba da da da da da da, ba da dahhhhhhhhhh.....

WorldBeat Center said...

MIKEY DREAD WAS ONE OF THE GREATEST ARTIST IN JAMROCK HISTORY. HE WAS HARD WORKING AND LOVED.
IN SAN DIEGO HE IS A HERO.
IM A RADIO DJ AND PROMOTER. I HAD MIKEY DREAD IN CONCERT IN OCT 2007 AND I HAVE WORKED WITH HIM FOR 30 YEARS.
MIKEY WILL BE MISSED IN THE WORLD OF REGGAE.
THAT IS WHY WE CHANGE OUR BOB MARLEY DAY TO TRIBUTE TO THE REGGAE LEGENDS TO HONOR OUR LEGENDS OF REGGAE, THE MUSIC THAT HAS CHANGED THE WORLD.
BLESSING AND RASPECT TO THE LEGENDS OF RASTAFARI MUSIC

Anonymous said...

Some great reggae tunes from Mikey Dread. Taste is good .